Gisr el-Mudir

Gisr el-MudirSouthwest of the Step Pyramid complex of king Djoser lies a large enclosure, known as the ‘Gisr el-Mudir'. The rectangular enclosure (app. 350 x 650 m.) measures almost double the size of the enclosure of king Djoser and almost four times the size of the Step Pyramid complex of king Sekhemkhet. The apparent lack of a central structure within the enclosure and the possible mudbrick platform in the southern part seem to point to its cultic nature. The pottery recovered (both in stratigraphical context and as surface finds) dates to the end of the Second Dynasty and the beginning of the Third Dynasty. Other circumstantial evidence leads scholars to believe that king Khasekhemwy could be the founder. The Gisr el-Mudir predates the Step Pyramid complex of king Djoser, and is therefore the oldest monumental stone construction in Ancient Egypt.

The factfiles below are based on M. Lehner's 'The Complete Pyramids', London, 1997 and P.A. Clayton's 'Chronicle of the Pharaohs', London, 1994.

Gisr el-Mudir
          Khasekhemwy
   

Pharaoh
:
(most likely) Khasekhemwy
      Horus name
:
Kha-sekhem
Dynasty
:
2            
Location
:
Saqqara       Father
:
?
Ancient name
:
possibly 'The Goddess Endures'
      Mother
:
?
            Wife
:
Nymaathep
Enclosure
:
c. 350 x 650 m
      Sons
:
Djoser, Sanakht
            Daughter(s)
:
?
Discovered
:
Jacques de Morgan, 1897
           
            Burial
:
Tomb V, Abydos